Waiting On Wednesday (2)

Waiting On Wednesday

Waiting On Wednesday is a weekly event hosted by Breaking The Spine that spotlights new releases that you are eagerly anticipating.

 

Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea by April Genevieve Tucholke

Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea by April Genevieve Tucholke

Expected Publishing Date: August 15, 2013

Authors Website

 

Summary

You stop fearing the devil when you’re holding his hand… Nothing much exciting rolls through Violet White’s sleepy, seaside town…until River West comes along. River rents the guesthouse behind Violet’s crumbling estate, and as eerie, grim things start to happen, Violet begins to wonder about the boy living in her backyard. Is River just a crooked-smiling liar with pretty eyes and a mysterious past? Or could he be something more? Violet’s grandmother always warned her about the Devil, but she never said he could be a dark-haired boy who takes naps in the sun, who likes coffee, who kisses you in a cemetery…who makes you want to kiss back. Violet’s already so knee-deep in love, she can’t see straight. And that’s just how River likes it. Blending faded decadence and the thrilling dread of gothic horror, April Genevieve Tucholke weaves a dreamy, twisting contemporary romance, as gorgeously told as it is terrifying—a debut to watch.

I love this cover with the loopy font and dark, shadowy picture. I love a romance where there is a bad boy and who is the ultimate bad boy other than the devil himself?

This is another one I plan to read for the Debut Author Challenge.

Summary and cover image taken from goodreads.

Top Ten Tuesday: Kick-Ass Heroines

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Each week they pick a  fun topic for a top ten list. This weeks list is the top ten Kick-Ass Heroines.

 

1. Tris from Divergent

Divergent by Vernica Roth

2. Ayla from the Earth’s Children

The Clan Of The Cave Bear by Jean Auel

3. Lisbeth Salander from Millennium

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

4. Hermione Granger from Harry Potter 

Harry Potter And The Sorcers Stone by J.K. Rowling

5. Annabeth Chase from Percy Jackson And The Olympians

The Lightening Thief by Rick Riordan

6. Kit Tyler from The Witch Of Blackbird Pond

The Witch Of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare

7. Elisa from Fire And Thorns

The Girl Of Fire And Thorns by Rae Carson

8. Saphira from Inheritance

Eragon Book by Christopher Paolini

9. Tally Youngblood from Uglies

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

10. Isabelle Lightwood from The Mortal Instruments

City Of Bones By Cassandra Clare The Mortal Instruments

Who would you add to the list?

All images from goodreads.

Weekly Book Haul (5)

In My Mailbox is a weekly meme hosted by The Story Siren where you can share the books you received during the week. Stacking The Shelves is a weekly meme hosted by Tynga’s Reviews and is all about sharing the books you added to your shelves. 

 

In My Mailbox

Stacking-the-Shelves

Another slow week but I have a huge TBR pile and need to get that under control before I add more books.

Netgalley

Taxes In America by Leaonard E. Burman & Joel Slemrod

Taxes In America What Everyone Needs To Know by Leonard E. Burman & Joel Slemrod

Despite their passion and fury, contemporary Americans are remarkably clueless about how their tax system works. But with heated debates over taxation now roiling Congress and the nation, an understanding of our tax system is of vital importance. Taxes in America, by preeminent tax scholars Leonard E. Burman and Joel Slemrod, offers a clear, concise explanation of how our tax system works, how it affects people and businesses, and how it might be improved. Accessibly written and organized in a clear, question-and-answer format, the book describes the intricacies of the modern tax system in an easy-to-grasp manner. Burman and Slemrod begin with the basic definitions of taxes and then delve into more complicated and indeed contentious concerns. They address such questions as how to recognize Fool’s Gold tax reform plans. How much more tax could the IRS collect with better enforcement? How do tax burdens vary around the world? Why do corporations pay so little tax, even though they earn trillions of dollars every year? And what kind of tax system is most conducive to economic growth?

Looking forward to this one because I love learning about economics. (Plus it’s the first book I have requested via Netgalley because I don’t have the readership numbers to get approved for any big release and am not 100% certain how it all works.)

Library

The Last Apprentice Revenge Of The Witch by Joseph Delaney

Revenge Of The Witch by Joseph Delaney (The Last Apprentice/Wardstone Chronicles #1)

For years, Old Gregory has been the Spook for the county, ridding the local villages of evil. Now his time is coming to an end. But who will take over for him? Twenty-nine apprentices have tried—some floundered, some fled, some failed to stay alive. Only Thomas Ward is left. He’s the last hope, the last apprentice.

This has been on TBR list for a while.

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

When Richard Mayhew stops one day to help a girl he finds bleeding on a London pavement, his life is forever altered, for he finds himself propelled into an alternative reality that exists in a subterranean labyrinth of sewer canals and abandoned subway stations. He has fallen through the cracks of reality and has landed somewhere different, somewhere that is Neverwhere.

I am ashamed to admit that I have only read one other Neil Gaiman book (Anansi Boys).

What did you add to your shelves this week?

All summaries and images taken from goodreads.

Friday Favorites

I want to highlight articles and posts that caught my eye on books, publishing, and technology from the week.

 

The “New Adult” Category: Thoughts + Questions from Sarah at Clear Eyes, Full Shelves

Great topic and a really interesting take on the debate of whether this category is needed or just another way to market Young Adult books to adults.

 

YA Wednesday: 2012 National Book Award Finalist William Alexander And His “Goblin Secrets” from Jeff VanderMeer of Omnivoracious

Discusses Goblin Secrets and William Alexander’s shock at being a National Book Award Finalist.

 

Book Review: The Girl Of Fire And Thorns By Rae Carson from Amy of tripping over books

I love The Girl Of Fire And Thorns so much and this is a really great review of it.

 

ipad mini

Do you think this smaller ipad will see more readers using this as opposed the Nook and Kindle tablets? I think it will be interesting to see what the impact is on eBook readers.

 

Any bookish news that stood out for you this week?

 

 

 

The Last Dragonslayer By Jasper Fforde Review

The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde

The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde

Summary 

In the good old days, magic was indispensable – it could both save a kingdom and clear a clogged drain. But now magic is fading: drain cleaner is cheaper than a spell, and magic carpets are used for pizza delivery. Fifteen-year-old foundling Jennifer Strange runs Kazam, an employment agency for magicians – but it’s hard to stay in business when magic is drying up. And then the visions start, predicting the death of the world’s last dragon at the hands of an unnamed Dragonslayer. If the visions are true, everything will change for Kazam – and for Jennifer. Because something is coming. Something known as…Big Magic.

Review

Dragons, magic, and a strong female protagonist? What’s not to like.

Jennifer Strange is smart as a whip and older than her 15 years let on. She is swept up in the machinations of large corporations and an ancient prophecy while running an employment agency for magicians. 

Jasper Fforde creates a world that melds magic with the mundane. It is fun and light, very similar in tone to the Percy Jackson And The Olympians series. Like Percy Jackson, The Last Dragonslayer is a story that moves quickly while slowly building up the back story. It will keep you wanting to know more about Jennifer and the quirky world built by Fforde.

I enjoyed The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde immensely and am looking forward to reading book two, The Song Of The Quarkbeast.

 

I did win this book through goodreads but all opinions are my own.

All images and the summary are taken from goodreads.

Waiting On Wednesday

Waiting On Wednesday

Waiting On Wednesday is a weekly event hosted by Breaking The Spine that spotlights new releases that you are eagerly anticipating.

Being Henry David by Cal Armistead

Being Henry David by Cal Armistead

Expected Publishing Date: March 1st 2013 by Albert Whitman Teen 

Summary

Seventeen-year-old “Hank” has found himself at Penn Station in New York City with no memory of anything – who he is, where he came from, why he’s running away. His only possession is a worn copy of Walden, by Henry David Thoreau. And so he becomes Henry David or “Hand” and takes first to the streets, and then to the only destination he can think of – Walden Pond in Concord Massachusetts.

I plan on reading this one as part of the Debut Author Challenge.

Image and summary taken from goodreads.

Top Ten Tuesday: Books To Get In The Halloween Spirit

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Each week they pick a  fun topic for a top ten list. This weeks list is the top ten books to get in the Halloween Spirit.

 

1. Dracula by Bram Stoker

Classic horror and what is more in the Halloween spirit than scary vampires.

 

2. The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving

Classic, creepy short stories set in my beloved home of New England.

 

3. The Witches by Roald Dahl

A childhood favorite that never gets old.

 

4. Coraline by Neil Gaiman

Dark, creepy, and very quirky.

 

5. Goosebumps (Series) by R.L. Stine

At 31, I was the right age when these books first were published and this easily scared 12 year-old loved them all.

 

6. Stephen King

Pretty much anything he has ever written.

 

7. Interview With A Vampire by Anne Rice

As a teenager, just before the movie came out, my friends all took turns reading a dog-eared copy of this book. Really good then and still good now.

 

8. The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

Yes, this is a short story but when I can still remember the chills I felt reading this my sophomore year. Nothing says creepy like a public stoning.

 

9. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Classic for a reason.

 

10. Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Levin

What could be scarier than giving birth to the anti-christ?

 

What would you add to the list?

 

 

 

Weekly Book Haul (4)

I am linking up with In My Mailbox which is a weekly theme hosted by The Story Siren where you can share the books you received during the week. I am also linking up with Stacking The Shelves which is hosted by Tynga’s Reviews and is all about sharing the books you added to your shelves.

In My Mailbox

Stacking-the-Shelves

This was a slower week for me. I was mostly tempted by cheap or free downloads.

Kindle

The Deepest Cut by J.A. Templeton

The Deepest Cut (MacKinnon Curse #1) by J.A. Templeton

Sixteen-year-old Riley Williams has been able to see ghosts since the car crash that took her mother’s life and shattered her family. Guilt-ridden over the belief that she’s somehow responsible for her mom’s death, Riley is desperate to see her mother’s elusive spirit to gain her forgiveness. When her father moves the family to Scotland so that they can all start over, Riley believes her life couldn’t get worse – that is until the ghost of nineteen-year-old Ian MacKinnon catches her purposely cutting herself. An uneasy truce quickly turns into a quick friendship and soon Riley’s falling hard for Ian. Riley believes her gift could help Ian and the curse that has kept him tied to the land for centuries, but that would mean letting him go forever and she’s not strong enough to do that. As if her life wasn’t complicated enough, the spirit of the woman who killed Ian returns and she’ll stop at nothing to keep Riley from helping Ian find eternal peace.

What The Dead Know By Laura Lippman

What The Dead Know By Laura Lippman

This stand-alone thriller from Laura Lippman revolves around the mysterious disappearance of two young sisters in a Baltimore County shopping mall on Easter weekend in 1975. Still unsolved more than three decades later, the cold case suddenly become red-hot when a middle-aged woman involved in a car accident informs police that she is one of the Bethany sisters who went missing 30 years earlier. But her disjointed story, while factually accurate, raises concerns with Baltimore County cop Kevin Infante, who intuitively knows something isn’t quite right.

Nook

Magyk by Angie Sage

Magyk by Angie Sage (Septimus Heap #1)

The seventh son of the seventh son, aptly named Septimus Heap, is stolen the night he is born by a midwife who pronounces him dead. That same night, the baby’s father, Silas Heap, comes across a bundle in the snow containing a new-born girl with violet eyes. The Heaps take this helpless newborn into their home, name her Jenna, and raise her as their own. But who is this mysterious baby girl, and what really happened to their believed son Septimus?

Won

The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde

The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde

I won an ARC from goodreads.

In the good old days, magic was indispensable – it could both save a kingdom and clear a clogged drain. But now magic is fading: drain cleaner is cheaper than a spell, and magic carpets are used for pizza delivery. Fifteen-year-old foundling Jennifer Strange runs Kazam, an employment agency for magicians – but it’s hard to stay in business when magic is drying up. And then the visions start, predicting the death of the world’s last dragon at the hands of an unnamed Dragonslayer. If the visions are true, everything will change for Kazam – and for Jennifer. Because something is coming. Something known as…Big Magic.

What did you add to your shelves this week?

All images and summaries taken from goodreads.

The Casual Vacancy By J.K. Rowling A Review

The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling Review

When Barry Fairbrother dies in his early forties, the town of Pagford is left in shock. Pagford is, seemingly, an English idyll, with a cobbled market square and an ancient abbey, but what lies beneath the pretty facade is a town at war. Rich at war with poor, teenagers at war with their parents, wives at war with their husbands, teachers at war with their pupils…Pagford is not what it first seems. And the empty seat left by Barry on the parish council soon becomes the catalyst for the biggest war the town has yet seen. Who will triumph in an election fraught with passion, duplicity, and unexpected revelations?

I have so many thoughts about this book and must preface with a little bit about my own personal beliefs. I am a very political person (I am very active in county and state-wide politics). I would identify as a liberal. All that being said, I found The Casual Vacancy to be a well-written social commentary.

I believe it is the duty of society to help everyone. That all people deserve an equal chance to live a successful life and that the government has a hand in making that happen.

Right now in the United States, the concept of how and if we should help those who are struggling is being hotly contested in the Presidential election. Do we want to be a society where the luckiest of us succeed, oftentimes because of luck or numerous intangible benefits, and the rest are left to languish or one that aims to raise the level of all people? It is a question that J.K. Rowling so deftly handles here.

Pagford, the town so beautifully created by J.K. Rowling is having this same kind of identity crisis. Many years in the past, a portion of land once owned by a famous family in town is sold and public housing is built. Those living in the housing have access to the good schools of Pagford. There are those on the council who wish for the estates to become the problem of the next largest city of Yarvil. They feel that The Fields is a blight on their perfect town. 

The Casual Vacancy has a slow start. It revolves around an entire town and is full of characters. The change of voice from one character to the next was somewhat confusing until I really started to get a feel for who each character was. Around the 300 page mark, The Casual Vacancy really picks up steam. We start to see how interconnected this community is and how they can and do impact each others lives. It is not only a story of social responsibility, that we owe to our neighbors to make sure that those with less are treated with dignity but also that the attention that we pay can save lives.

The most tragic storyline of the Weedons is handled so well. We can see why Terri, who is abused nearly from birth, is barely able to function even if she seems to want to change. Why we get a cycle of abuse when her own negligence leads to her daughter acting out and eventually getting raped. It bucks the stereotype of the lazy person with their hand out waiting for their government check to read the story of what went so wrong in one family.

The ending is really brilliant and so tragic. It is like a dance in which each character misses their turn, and one small, seemingly insignificant action has huge ramifications on the lives of the most vulnerable.

The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling is a social commentary where you are forced to imagine the lives of those around you. They can be raw and cruel but the authenticity is really gripping.

Did you enjoy The Casual Vacancy?

Do you agree that we have a responsibility to build a better society together?

All images and summary from goodreads.

 

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: My Favorite Chick Lit Authors

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Each week they pick a fun topic for a top ten list. This weeks theme is your favorite author in whatever genre of your choosing. I chose Chick Lit authors. 

1. Marian Keyes – I love the Walsh sisters as if they were my own family. From Watermelon  to her newest The Mystery Of Mercy Close (I really need to get my hands on that book). Exactly what Chick Lit should be fun, heart breaking, and filled with wonderful characters.

2. Sophie Kinsella – The Shopaholic series was my first foray into Chick Lit. Outrageous and ridiculous, Becky Bloomwood is so much fun.

3. Helen Fielding – All I really need to say here is Bridget Jones’s Diary.

4. Jennifer Weiner – An American finally makes a debut on this list. Good In Bed is such a great book and I love that Cannie has a dog names Nifkin.

5. Jane Green – English but lives in my home state of Connecticut, Jane Green has written so many great books. (Bookends, Mr. Maybe, Jemima J.: A Novel About Ugly Ducklings And Swans to name a few.)

6. Candace Bushnell – Sex In The City is just such classic chick lit that she cannot be left off any list. 

7. Meg Cabot – I love all of her books but Heather Wells is such a great series.

8. Anna Mated – Getting Over It and Running In Heels are both great reads.

9. Lauren Weisberger – For this former assistant to the boss from hell, The Devil Wears Prada was like my life but way more posh and with no international travel.

10. Jodie Picoult – Mainly for My Sister’s Keeper which is tragic and thought provoking.

 

Who would you add to the list?