Requiem By Lauren Oliver A Review

Requiem by Lauren Oliver

Title: Requiem (Delirium #3)

Author: Lauren Oliver

Publication Date: March 5, 2013

Publisher: HarperCollins Children’s Books

Source: Purchased

Challenge: None

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Summary

They have tried to squeeze us out, to stamp us into the past.

But we are still here.

And there are more of us every day.

Now an active member of the resistance, Lena has been transformed. The nascent rebellion that was under way in Pandemonium has ignited into an all-out revolution in Requiem, and Lena is at the center of the fight.

After rescuing Julian from a death sentence, Lena and her friends fled to the Wilds. But the Wilds are no longer a safe haven—pockets of rebellion have opened throughout the country, and the government cannot deny the existence of Invalids. Regulators now infiltrate the borderlands to stamp out the rebels, and as Lena navigates the increasingly dangerous terrain, her best friend, Hana, lives a safe, loveless life in Portland as the fiancée of the young mayor.

Maybe we are driven crazy by our feelings.

Maybe love is a disease, and we would be better off without it.
But we have chosen a different road.

And in the end, that is the point of escaping the cure: We are free to choose.

We are even free to choose the wrong thing.

Requiem is told from both Lena’s and Hana’s points of view. The two girls live side by side in a world that divides them until, at last, their stories converge.

 

As is often the case, starting the last book in a trilogy can be difficult. There are all kinds of expectations and desires for the story to end on the right note. For the storylines to be wrapped-up in a way that makes sense but maybe isn’t perfectly neat. Of course any story where you have a love triangle, our main character has to pick the right partner. All of these things and more were circling around my head when I start reading Requiem by Lauren Oliver.

Requiem does alternate the voices of Hana and Lena. I love that we are able to learn about Hana’s life because it rounds out the story. It fills in the gaps of what might have happened to Lena if she had chosen to stay. Hana being paired with the newly elected major gives us a great insight to the have’s of society. Those whose lives are filled with all of the worldly comforts and those who are in places of great power. With this insiders view, Requiem becomes more of a political and philosophical commentary than the other books in the series. It opens up the story to the greater questions of how our choices define us and what makes us actually free.

I love that Requiem did not spend all of its time on the love triangle. Yes, I was eagerly anticipating Lena choosing between Alex and Julian, but Lena is not Bella Swan. Instead, she is a complete individual who is strong and capable, not a girl who is defined by a man or her relationship to one. I do like how Lauren Oliver does not use the love triangle as the sole way to make the reader feel. There are other relationships that are even more important, those of friendship and family.

I have tried to avoid reading any reviews of Requiem because I needed to read this book without any other thoughts in my head. I can guess that some reviewers may find the ending frustrating but I thought it was beautiful. With her way with words, Lauren Oliver writes a beautiful ending that leaves the reader with lots to think about. Overall, I think that Requiem is  a wonderful end to a superb trilogy. I highly recommend it to anyone who enjoyed the first two books.

Favorite Quotes

All of you, wherever you are: in your spiny cities or your one-bump towns. Find it, the hard stuff, the links of metal and chink, the fragments of stone filling your stomach. And pull, pull, and pull.

Or maybe I will keep walking until I reach the end of the world.

Maybe. But for now there is only the high white sun, and the sky, and tendrils of gray smoke, and voices that sound like ocean waves in the distance.

What You Will Find

  • Strong female characters
  • Message of hope
  • Lots of action
  • Growth
  • Friendship
  • Connecticut (I am biased being from the Hartford area)

Cover image and summary from goodreads.

In The Stacks (5)

What I added to my stacks (and stacks and stacks) this week. I am linking up with Stacking The Shelves by Tynga’s Reviews and In My Mailbox hosted by The Story Siren.

I am slowing down on book buying this month while my office is being renovated. We had some storm damage to the side of the house where my husband and my offices are located and had to fix the drywall, replace the carpet, and paint. So there are literally books (and office furniture) all over my house until we can finish fixing up the rooms. One more week until the painting is completed and I can finally have my house back.

Kindle

Going Bovine by Libba Bray

Going Bovine by Libba Bray

Can Cameron find what he’s looking for?

All 16-year-old Cameron wants is to get through high school—and life in general—with a minimum of effort. It’s not a lot to ask. But that’s before he’s given some bad news: he’s sick and he’s going to die. Which totally sucks. Hope arrives in the winged form of Dulcie, a loopy punk angel/possible hallucination with a bad sugar habit. She tells Cam there is a cure—if he’s willing to go in search of it. With the help of a death-obsessed, video-gaming dwarf and a yard gnome, Cam sets off on the mother of all road trips through a twisted America into the heart of what matters most.

I have heard nothing but wonderful things about Going Bovine plus it won a Printz Award. Also, video-gaming dwarf!

Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt

Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt

“When I look back on my childhood I wonder how I managed to survive at all. It was, of course, a miserable childhood: the happy childhood is hardly worth your while. Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood, and worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood.”

So begins the luminous memoir of Frank McCourt, born in Depression-era Brooklyn to recent Irish immigrants and raised in the slums of Limerick, Ireland. Frank’s mother, Angela, has no money to feed the children since Frank’s father, Malachy, rarely works, and when he does he drinks his wages. Yet Malachy—exasperating, irresponsible, and beguiling—does nurture in Frank an appetite for the one thing he can provide: a story. Frank lives for his father’s tales of Cuchulain, who saved Ireland, and of the Angel on the Seventh Step, who brings his mother babies.

Perhaps it is story that accounts for Frank’s survival. Wearing rags for diapers, begging a pig’s head for Christmas dinner and gathering coal from the roadside to light a fire, Frank endures poverty, near-starvation and the casual cruelty of relatives and neighbors—yet lives to tell his tale with eloquence, exuberance, and remarkable forgiveness.

I have meant to read Angela’s Ashes for forever but never gotten around to it.

Used Books

The Forest House by Marion Zimmer Bradley

The Forest House by Marion Zimmer Bradley

The Forest House—prequel to The Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradley’s beloved and enduring classic—is a mesmerizing epic of one woman’s mythic role at a turning point in history. In a Britain struggling to survive Roman invasion, Eilan is the daughter of a Druidic warleader, gifted with visions and marked by fate to become a priestess of the Forest House.

But fate also led Eilan to Gaius, a soldier of mixed blood, son of the Romans sent to subdue the native British. For Gaius, Eilan felt forbidden love, and her terrible secret will haunt her even as she is anointed as the new High Priestess. With mighty enemies poised to destroy the magic the Forest House shelters, Eilan must trust in the power of the great Goddess to lead her through the treacherous labyrinth of her destiny.

I love The Mists Of Avalon and have read it many times. Not sure why it has taken me years to pick-up book two in the series but I have high hopes that it is as good as book one.

Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier

Cold Mountain by Charles FrazierThe hero of Charles Frazier’s first novel is Inman, a disillusioned Confederate soldier who has failed to die as expected after being seriously wounded in battle during the last days of the Civil War. Rather than waiting to be redeployed to the front, the soul-sick Inman deserts, and embarks on a dangerous and lonely odyssey through the devastated South, heading home to North Carolina and seeking only to be reunited with his beloved, Ada, who has herself been struggling to maintain the family farm she inherited. Cold Mountain is a deeply-imagined addition to the literature of one of the most transformational periods in American history.

Another book I have meant to read forever.

One Day by David Nicholls

One Day by David Nicholls

Emma and Dexter meet for the first time on the night of their graduation. Tomorrow they must go their separate ways. So where will they be on this one day next year? And the year after that? And every year that follows?

Twenty years, two people, ONE DAY.

Want to know a way to get me to purchase your book? Have Nick Hornby blurb it.

What did you add to your stacks this week?

 

All cover images and summaries from goodreads.

Waiting On Wednesday–The Brokenhearted By Amelia Kahaney

Waiting On Wednesday is a weekly event hosted by Breaking The Spine that spotlights new releases that you are eagerly anticipating. This week I am waiting on The Brokenhearted by Amelia Kahaney.

The Brokenhearted by Amelia Kahaney

Title: The Brokenhearted

Author: Amelia Kahaney

Publisher: HarperTeen

Expected Publishing Date: October 8, 2013

Summary

A teenage girl is transformed into a reluctant superhero and must balance her old life with the dark secret of who she has become.

Prima ballerina Anthem Fleet is closely guarded by her parents in their penthouse apartment. But when she meets the handsome Gavin at a party on the wrong side of town, she is immediately drawn into his dangerous world. Then, in a tragic accident, Anthem falls to her death. She awakes in an underground lab, with a bionic heart ticking in her chest. As she navigates her new life, she uncovers the sinister truth behind those she trusted the most, and the chilling secret of her family lineage…and her duty to uphold it.

The Dark Knight meets Cinder in this gripping and cinematic story of heartbreak and revenge. From Alloy Entertainment, this inventive new superhero story is sure to captivate any reader.

A ballerina turned superhero with a bionic heart plus a dark family secret, sounds just amazing. I love books where a main character is not who she thought she was.

Cover image and summary taken from goodreads.