Early Review:Ink By Amanda Sun

Ink by Amanda Sun

Title: Ink

Series: Paper Gods #1

Author: Amanda Sun

Publisher: Harlequin Teen

Publication Date: June 25, 2013

Source: Netgalley

Genre: Young Adult, Paranormal

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Summary

I looked down at the paper, still touching the tip of my shoe. I reached for it, flipping the page over to look.

Scrawls of ink outlined a drawing of a girl lying on a bench.

A sick feeling started to twist in my stomach, like motion sickness.

And then the girl in the drawing turned her head, and her inky eyes glared straight into mine.

On the heels of a family tragedy, the last thing Katie Greene wants to do is move halfway across the world. Stuck with her aunt in Shizuoka, Japan, Katie feels lost. Alone. She doesn’t know the language, she can barely hold a pair of chopsticks, and she can’t seem to get the hang of taking her shoes off whenever she enters a building.

Then there’s gorgeous but aloof Tomohiro, star of the school’s kendo team. How did he really get the scar on his arm? Katie isn’t prepared for the answer. But when she sees the things he draws start moving, there’s no denying the truth: Tomo has a connection to the ancient gods of Japan, and being near Katie is causing his abilities to spiral out of control. If the wrong people notice, they’ll both be targets.

Review

I really wanted to like Ink by Amanda Sun but found the book problematic. The kiss of death for me, and the reason why I put the book down halfway into it, is insta-love. One page Katie is suspicious of Tomo and certain that he is a huge jerk (after having spoken to him two times) and the next page he is the person who understands her best. Yes, a tragic event in both of their lives could be the catalyst for this ridiculously quick love, but I just did not believe it.

When I am at the halfway point of a book, I know it is not going well if I do not care about the characters. The characters in Ink by Amanda Sun are not fleshed out. I never got the feel of Katie, even though I spent so many pages in her head. Katie has two friends from school, who should be more fleshed out but are not. Even her Aunt, who takes her in and must have an interesting story about why she lives in Japan, is not. In Ink, I was unable to connect to any of the characters and lost interest in the direction the story was going.

Ink by Amanda Sun is a decently written book, which gives me hope that Amanda Sun may write other books that would be more suited to my tastes. When my TBR stack is towering, I just cannot spend time reading books that leave me feeling nothing but a slight irritation. I wanted to like Ink by Amanda Sun for its beautiful cover and unique location but it was not enough.

Summary and cover image from goodreads.

I was given an eARC of Ink by Harlequin Teen but it did bot influence my review. All thoughts are my own.

Gameboard Of The Gods By Richelle Mead A Review

Gameboard Of The Gods by Richelle Mead

Title: Gameboard Of The Gods

Series: Age Of X #1

Author: Richelle Mead

Publisher: Dutton Adult

Publication Date: June 4, 2013

Source: Netgalley

Genre: Adult Dystopian, Science Fiction

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Summary

In a futuristic world nearly destroyed by religious extremists, Justin March lives in exile after failing in his job as an investigator of religious groups and supernatural claims. But Justin is given a second chance when Mae Koskinen comes to bring him back to the Republic of United North America (RUNA). Raised in an aristocratic caste, Mae is now a member of the military’s most elite and terrifying tier, a soldier with enhanced reflexes and skills.

When Justin and Mae are assigned to work together to solve a string of ritualistic murders, they soon realize that their discoveries have exposed them to terrible danger. As their investigation races forward, unknown enemies and powers greater than they can imagine are gathering in the shadows, ready to reclaim the world in which humans are merely game pieces on their board.

Review

Reviewing Gameboard Of The Gods by Richelle Mead is difficult. I liked the book and thought it was mostly good. (Not using star reviews on All The Stacks, it can be hard for me to explain what I mean by good. On goodreads, for example, I gave Gameboard Of The Gods three stars.) The book has a lot of potential but the problems made it a slugfest at times where I kept checking how long my Kindle thought it would take me to finish.

Gameboard Of The Gods has a solid story. Hot shot guy, Justin March, who is given a chance to get his job back after four years of exile. The catch is he has to solve the mystery behind these ritualistic murders. All solid and quite interesting stuff here. Here is my problem, it takes forever. Even with the book being overly long, I never felt I really understood what was happening. The story takes place in a dystopian world that is never fully fleshed out. We never really learn what happened to have society end up like it is. Why is RUNA, which stands for Republic Of North America which is not spelled out until many chapters into the book, one of the only places to prosper. There is talk about the before and hints that religion and genetic mutations caused a lot of it but I would have liked more specific details. I also had a difficult time picturing the world. There are areas, somewhere in North America, where ethnic groups live. They live within the country but separately. This is important because the murders involve these groups and the main characters do quite a lot of travelling. It took me until halfway through the book to get a good explanation about these groups and why they decided to live separately. The length of time it took to reveal many important plot points, like why Justin is sent into exile and what on earth is up with the talking birds that live in his head, is frustrating.

All of these issues aside, the actual story is interesting. I enjoyed the who-done-it-ness of the plot. I enjoyed how many strong female characters the books contains. Waiting so long to reveal really important information about the main characters lives, motivations, and backstory, made it difficult to care about them until the end of the book. I enjoyed the characters and the overarching world enough to read a book two. It will be read with caution and with the hope that it will be more concise.

Overall, I can recommend Gameboard Of Gods by Richelle Mead but would suggest checking it out from the library or borrowing it from a friend rather than purchasing it. See if it is something that you like before making the purchasing plunge. As I said in the beginning of this review, writing about Gameboard Of The Gods by Richelle Mead is difficult because it has lot of potential but quite a few problems.   

I did receive an eARC in exchange for my honest review. All thoughts are my own.

Summary and cover image from goodreads.

Review: Twerp by Mark Goldblatt

Twerp by Mark Goldblatt

Title: Twerp

Author: Mark Goldblatt

Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers

Publication Date: May 28, 2013

Source: Netgalley

Genre: Middle Grade, Contemporary

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Summary

It’s not like I meant for Danley to get hurt. . . .

Julian Twerski isn’t a bully. He’s just made a big mistake. So when he returns to school after a weeklong suspension, his English teacher offers him a deal: if he keeps a journal and writes about the terrible incident that got him and his friends suspended, he can get out of writing a report on Shakespeare. Julian jumps at the chance. And so begins his account of life in sixth grade–blowing up homemade fireworks, writing a love letter for his best friend (with disastrous results), and worrying whether he’s still the fastest kid in school. Lurking in the background, though, is the one story he can’t bring himself to tell, the one story his teacher most wants to hear.

Review

Twerp by Mark Goldblatt lets the reader read the journals of the sixth grader Julian Twerski. His English teacher offers him the option of keeping the journals and writing about the incident that caused him to be suspended. Using the journal as a writing device is just brilliant. It lets the reader see into Julian’s life. It leads us to the incident that they are ultimately supposed to be about but not before the reader is ready to know what it is. To learn about his hopes and fears. Julian is so smart and funny but has the same problem many 12-year-old boys do. He doesn’t really understand girls. He sometimes makes bad decisions that backfire in horrible ways.

In each chapter, Julian tells a story of something that happens in his life. He talks about writing a love letter for a friend. Of course, this goes all wrong and the girl thinks he wrote it. Julian is unsure what to do in this situation and ends up going to his sister for advice. Julian worries constantly about no longer being the fastest kid in school. This is so important to him and it builds up to a final showdown at the Track and Field Day. Julian, as an adult, would likely look back on these two events and realize they are not all that important in the scheme of things. Yet, at twelve they are huge events and it feels real that they effect him the way that they do.

Eventually, we find out what Julian did to be suspended. It is ultimately shocking because by this point, we have gotten to know Julian. We know that he is a sweet kid that obviously made a huge mistake. It makes the story that much more difficult to read knowing that he is not just a bad kid. That he should have known better.

Twerp by Mark Goldblatt is a touching coming-of-age story that will transport you to 1969. It is well-written and an enjoyable read. I would highly recommend it to young readers (especially boys) because it is engaging and teaches a powerful lesson. Take charge, be yourself, and speak up when you know something is wrong before it is too late.

I was provided an eARC from the publisher via Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

Summary and cover image from goodreads.

Review: The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey

The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey

Title: The 5th Wave

Author: Rick Yancey

Publisher: Putnam Juvenile

Publication Date: May 7, 2013

Source: Purchased

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Summary

After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.

Now, it’s the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth’s last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie’s only hope for rescuing her brother—or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.

Review

I have to start by saying, I loved every second of The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey. I wanted to lock myself in a room with a do not disturb sign on the door until I was done (sadly, it actually took me five days to read it because I have to do things like go to work and sleep.) I loved it so much that I might even recommend that you stop reading this review and get yourself a copy of The 5th Wave and start reading right now.

All that being said, The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey is a book I had high expectations of going in. In case you skipped over the first paragraph of this review, my expectations were actually exceeded and it really does live up to all the hype. Starting with the characters, we have Cassie, her father, and her five year-old brother, Sammy. Forced to leave their home, the goal is to get to an Air force base where they have a better chance for survival. Cassie is fierce and independent. Rick Yancey lets us in on what Cassie is thinking and she is both smart and funny. The use of humor and sarcasm throughout The 5th Wave gives an otherwise pretty dark book, some levity. Eventually, Cassie is separated from her brother and she spends most of the book plotting to get him back.

The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey is broken down into sections that contain chapters in the voices of different characters. I loved this because it really lets you get to know the characters and what their motivations are. Not everyone is what they seem and getting to see into their heads, gives you a much better understanding of what is going on. The dire situation (hello, alien invasion and the world is ending) keeps The 5th Wave in constant motion. There is one lull for a love story but even that serves a purpose in pushing everyone forward.

I love how the different stories interconnect in ways that are surprising. There are quite a few places in The 5th Wave where I was very surprised by a turn of events. It forces the reader to be on the edge of their seat for the entire 480 pages and never lets up. Everything from the dialogue to the action is pitch perfect throughout. The only negative I can mention about The 5th Wave is the massive feeling of loss I have for having finished it and waiting who knows how long for the next book. So please, take my advice and get yourself a copy of The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey. I promise you will not regret it.

 

Summary and cover image from goodreads.

 

Review: Nantucket Blue By Leila Howland

Nantucket Blue by Leila Howard

Title: Nantucket Blue

Author: Leila Howland

Source: Netgalley

Publisher: Disney Hyperion

Publication Date: May 7, 2013

Challenge: Debut Author Challenge

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Summary

For Cricket Thompson, a summer like this one will change everything. A summer spent on Nantucket with her best friend, Jules Clayton, and the indomitable Clayton family. A summer when she’ll make the almost unattainable Jay Logan hers. A summer to surpass all dreams.

Some of this turns out to be true. Some of it doesn’t.

When Jules and her family suffer a devastating tragedy that forces the girls apart, Jules becomes a stranger whom Cricket wonders whether she ever really knew. And instead of lying on the beach working on her caramel-colored tan, Cricket is making beds and cleaning bathrooms to support herself in paradise for the summer.

But it’s the things Cricket hadn’t counted on–most of all, falling hard for someone who should be completely off-limits–that turn her dreams into an exhilarating, bittersweet reality.

A beautiful future is within her grasp, and Cricket must find the grace to embrace it. If she does, her life could be the perfect shade of Nantucket blue.

Review

Nantucket Blue by Leila Howland is the perfect book for summer. It evokes the feelings of being young and hoping the summer would be magical. That everything could change if you can get the right boy to notice you and spend the summer near the water. 

Nantucket Blue by Leila Howland captures a summer in New England (and this New Englander loved the setting but I may be biased.) Cricket Thompson is in the summer before her senior year and is about to turn 18. She spends most of her time with her best friend Jules and her family until tragedy strikes. So what was meant to be an epic summer with her best friend, turns into a summer where she lives on her own and is forced to confront the feelings she has been hiding from.

Cricket is a very likeable and relatable character. She is hurt by her parents actions but is unsure how to handle it. As the child of divorced parents, I found this story line handled in a accurate way. Being almost an adult but having little control of those in your life can be difficult.

Nantucket Blue has a great love story where Cricket finally meets the right guy. This part of the book is so sweet and very swoon worthy. It also shows maturity on Crickets part when she has to choose between what is right in front of her and what she thought she always wanted.

Nantucket Blue by Leila Howland is a beautiful story about growing-up and learning to confront your problems. The love story is excellent and made it difficult to put down. The ending is ultimately satisfying and I was sad that it was over. I highly recommend picking up a copy of Nantucket Blue this summer. 

What You Will Find

  • Catty girls
  • Great setting
  • Cute boys
  • Great love story
  • Coming-of-age

I did receive a copy of Nantucket Blue via Netgalley but all opinions are my own.

Cover image and summary from goodreads.

Zenn Scarlett By Christian Schoon

Zenn Scarlett by Christian Schoon

Title: Zenn Scarlett

Author: Christian Schoon

Publisher: Strange Chemistry

Publication Date: May 7, 2013

Source: ARC from publisher

Challenge: Debut Author Challenge

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Summary

Zenn Scarlett is a resourceful, determined 17-year-old girl working hard to make it through her novice year of exovet training. That means she’s learning to care for alien creatures that are mostly large, generally dangerous and profoundly fascinating. Zenn’s all-important end-of-term tests at the Ciscan Cloister Exovet Clinic on Mars are coming up, and, she’s feeling confident of acing the exams. But when a series of inexplicable animal escapes and other disturbing events hit the school, Zenn finds herself being blamed for the problems. As if this isn’t enough to deal with, her absent father has abruptly stopped communicating with her; Liam Tucker, a local towner boy, is acting unusually, annoyingly friendly; and, strangest of all: Zenn is worried she’s started sharing the thoughts of the creatures around her. Which is impossible, of course. Nonetheless, she can’t deny what she’s feeling.

Now, with the help of Liam and Hamish, an eight-foot sentient insectoid also training at the clinic, Zenn must learn what’s happened to her father, solve the mystery of who, if anyone, is sabotaging the cloister, and determine if she’s actually sensing the consciousness of her alien patients… or just losing her mind. All without failing her novice year….

Review

Zenn Scarlett by Christian Schoon is a fun and quirky sci-fi story about a girl who lives on Mars and is determined to become an Exovet (alien veterinarian). The first part of the book is full of descriptions of the exotic space animals that Zenn cares for at the Ciscan Cloister Exovet Clinic. To move to the next level in her training, she has to pass three tests. A mishap during the first test leaves Zenn questioning her sanity and those around her.

I really liked the character of Zenn, she works hard and is brave. She is smart and  passionate about becoming an exovet. The character of Hamish is interesting. He is pretty much a giant bug who acts as the cloisters care taker. He has difficulty thinking for himself and is constantly asking permission before doing the most menial of tasks. Zenn and Hamish have an sort-of friendship that gives Zenn Scarlett a bit of comic relief.

The middle of the book starts to pick-up as we learn more about the Martian political situation and why the neighbors of the cloisters may want it to close its doors. Zenn starts to put the pieces together and tries to find out who is behind the accidents and why. This was my favorite part of the story. I love a good mystery and Christian Schoon drops hints throughout the entire book to a much bigger, overarching story. 

Zenn does have a romantic interest in Liam, who helps around the cloisters. He is the only person her own age that Zenn has ever been friends with. I found this relationship sweet and it was nice to see Zenn open-up. (Liam is also a cat lover which to this cat lover, makes a guy so much more swoon worthy.)

I ultimately enjoyed Zenn Scarlett by Christian Schoon. The last half of the book was much more interesting than the first half, so hang in for it. The writing was very cinematic and I could easily picture Zenn Scarlett as a TV show. Overall, I would have preferred more action and fewer animals but still found Zenn Scarlett to be a solid read. The ending has a cliffhanger and left me wanting to know where this story is going. I would definitely read the next book in this series

This book was provided for me to review by Strange Chemistry. All opinions are my own.

Cover image and summary from goodreads.

The Lost Hero By Rick Riordan

The Lost Hero by Rick Riordan

Title: The Lost Hero

Author: Rick Riordan

Series: Heroes Of Olympus #1

Publisher: Disney Hyperion

Publication Date: October 12, 2010

Source: Purchased

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Summary

Jason has a problem. He doesn’t remember anything before waking in a bus full of kids on a field trip. Apparently he has a girlfriend named Piper, and his best friend is a guy named Leo. They’re all students at the Wilderness School, a boarding school for “bad kids,” as Leo puts it. What did Jason do to end up here? And where is here, exactly? Jason doesn’t know anything-except that everything seems very wrong.

Piper has a secret. Her father, a famous actor, has been missing for three days, ever since she had that terrifying nightmare about his being in trouble. Piper doesn’t understand her dream, or why her boyfriend suddenly doesn’t recognize her. When a freak storm hits during the school trip, unleashing strange creatures and whisking her, Jason, and Leo away to someplace called Camp Half-Blood, she has a feeling she’s going to find out, whether she wants to or not.

Leo has a way with tools. When he sees his cabin at Camp Half-Blood, filled with power tools and machine parts, he feels right at home. But there’s weird stuff, too — like the curse everyone keeps talking about, and some camper who’s gone missing. Weirdest of all, his bunkmates insist that each of them — including Leo — is related to a god. Does this have anything to do with Jason’s amnesia, or the fact that Leo keeps seeing ghosts?

Review

I have to start this review by saying that I love Rick Riordan and the Percy Jackson And The Olympians series. Starting The Lost Hero, I had high expectations because the Percy Jackson books are so excellent and I can happily say those expectations were met. The Lost Hero is part of The Heroes Of Olympus series but it takes place in the same world as Percy Jackson. There are many crossover characters and the feel is very similar. This is a good thing because the Percy Jackson universe is so full of excitement and humor, that I was happy to return.

The Lost Hero by Rick Riordan gives us three new heroes who are part of a new great prophecy. Piper, Leo, and Jason are regular kids who meet at a school for troubled children. Jason is in the unique situation of having his memory completely missing but we learn more about him throughout the adventure. As the story unfolds, we are introduced to new Gods and Goddesses while learning about new and greater enemies.

One of the greatest parts of any Rick Riordan books, besides the epic adventure, is the relationships. Piper, Leo, and Jason are forced into impossible situations and have to learn to rely on each other to get out of them. Learning to trust your instincts and solve your own problems are excellent lessons for all of us. The heroes grow and change, while learning how to do the right thing.

Even though The Lost Hero is a hefty 553 pages, it can easily be read in a sitting. I flew through it, needing to know what would happen next. Just like every other book I have read by Rick Riordan, as soon as I finished The Lost Hero I wanted to purchase the next book and continue the adventure. Rick Riordan is one author who really makes me wish I had children with whom I could share these wonderful books with. (Thinking about it now, my nephew will be receiving the Percy Jackson And The Olympians series for Christmas. He is not a big reader but I think those books can really help change a non-reader into a reader. Especially a little boy.) So in summary, drop what ever you are reading and pick up a copy of The Lost Hero. It is excellent and I guarantee you will enjoy it.

What You Will Find

  • Epic adventure
  • Characters you already love
  • Lots of learning about the Greeks and Romans
  • Laughter

 

The Eternity Cure By Julie Kagawa

The Eternity Cure by Julie Kagawa

Title: The Eternity Cure (Blood Of Eden #2)

Author: Julie Kagawa

Series: The Immortal Rules (Blood Of Eden #1)

Publisher: Harlequin Teen

Publication Date: April 30, 2013

Source: Netgalley

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Summary

Allison Sekemoto has vowed to rescue her creator, Kanin, who is being held hostage and tortured by the psychotic vampire Sarren. The call of blood leads her back to the beginning—New Covington and the Fringe, and a vampire prince who wants her dead yet may become her wary ally.

Even as Allie faces shocking revelations and heartbreak like she’s never known, a new strain of the Red Lung virus that decimated humanity is rising to threaten human and vampire alike.

Book Trailer

 

 

Review

The Eternity Cure by Julie Kagawa starts where The Immortal Rules leaves off. Allie is forced to leave Eden and she knows she has to help her maker Kanin. Allie has dreams of the torture being inflicted on Kanin and follows the pull that will lead her to him. With a slight twist, Allie is lead to Jackal, the raider king who killed her friends. Allie is forced to work with Jackal in tracking down Kanin and ultimately fighting the old and powerful Sarren to save those she loves.

Allison Sekemoto is as conflicted in The Eternity Cure as she was in The Immortal Rules. She believes that there is a demon deep inside of her but wants to do the right thing. Allie has a strict moral code which she lives by and seeing her struggle to do the right thing, is an important part of The Eternity Cure.

The Eternity Cure by Julie Kagawa is fast-paced, full of action, and difficult to put down. Julie Kagawa keeps things interesting by having characters that were previously evil, do some good. The shades of gray is such an important part of The Eternity Cure because in this society, where it is kill or be killed, you have to make difficult decisions. Watching Allie struggle to do the right thing even in the face of tremendous obstacles, shows how strong she is. I do love that Allie is forced to work with Jackal. While he may be evil and quite self-centered, his constant barbed speech adds levity to what is a dark book. It is impossible not to be glad that Jackal is around.

The Eternity Cure by Julie Kagawa is immensely entertaining and does a great job of moving the story of Allison Sekemoto forward. This book is not filler but a fully fleshed story that would be interesting on its own. I highly recommend The Eternity Cure for those who like their vampires a little dark and their world a little bleak.

What You Will Find

  • Romance
  • Kick Ass Female Lead
  • Vampires
  • Experiments

Cover image and summary from goodreads.

 

Code Name Verity By Elizabeth Wein

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Title: Code Name Verity

Author: Elizabeth Wein

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Publication Date: May 15, 2012

Source: Library

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Summary

Oct. 11th, 1943-A British spy plane crashes in Nazi-occupied France. Its pilot and passenger are best friends. One of the girls has a chance at survival. The other has lost the game before it’s barely begun.
When “Verity” is arrested by the Gestapo, she’s sure she doesn’t stand a chance. As a secret agent captured in enemy territory, she’s living a spy’s worst nightmare. Her Nazi interrogators give her a simple choice: reveal her mission or face a grisly execution.

As she intricately weaves her confession, Verity uncovers her past, how she became friends with the pilot Maddie, and why she left Maddie in the wrecked fuselage of their plane. On each new scrap of paper, Verity battles for her life, confronting her views on courage, failure and her desperate hope to make it home. But will trading her secrets be enough to save her from the enemy?

Review

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein is a very special book. The writing is exceptional and the way both stories are told is so unique. The focus is on the friendship of two brave women who are still able to laugh in an impossible situation. They are still able to have a clear head in a literal life and death situation. That even in the face of torture,  are able to sacrifice for the good of the whole.

Code Name Verity is a must read for those who wish to be challenged by a book. I want to be careful not to give anything away, because this book contains many twists and turns, Code Name Verity is just brilliant. An author being able to write about WWII era planes in a way that held my interest, just shows how strong the writing is. You can feel what they feel and it can be heartbreaking. Through all of the action, and there is a lot of action here, the relationships are what truly stands out. The French family who risk their necks, literally, to help rescue prisoners to a woman who sees the talent in another and makes sure she is able to fly. Through the horror of war, we see the real strength of character. The way we can help make the world a better place by standing for our convictions and making difficult choices.  

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein deserves all of the accolades it has received and is a must read. It is haunting and brilliantly written. It is an emotional and powerful story that I highly recommend. 

What You Will Find

  • Friendship
  • Strength
  • Action
  • Intrigue
  • Twists and turns

Cover image and summary from goodreads.

Mila 2.0 By Debra Driza

Mila 2.0 by Debra Driza

Title: Mila 2.0

Author: Debra Driza

Publisher: Katherine Tegen Books

Publication Date: March 12, 2013

Source: ARC from 2013 Debut Author Challenge ARC Tour

Challenge: Debut Author Challenge

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Summary

Mila 2.0 is the first book in an electrifying sci-fi thriller series about a teenage girl who discovers that she is an experiment in artificial intelligence.

Mila was never meant to learn the truth about her identity. She was a girl living with her mother in a small Minnesota town. She was supposed to forget her past—that she was built in a secret computer science lab and programmed to do things real people would never do.

Now she has no choice but to run—from the dangerous operatives who want her terminated because she knows too much and from a mysterious group that wants to capture her alive and unlock her advanced technology. However, what Mila’s becoming is beyond anyone’s imagination, including her own, and it just might save her life.

Mila 2.0 is Debra Driza’s bold debut and the first book in a Bourne Identity-style trilogy that combines heart-pounding action with a riveting exploration of what it really means to be human. Fans of I Am Number Four will love Mila for who she is and what she longs to be—and a cliffhanger ending will leave them breathlessly awaiting the sequel.

Review

This review does contain some spoilers.

I was really excited to read Mila 2.0 by Debra Driza and elated when it showed up as part of the 2013 Debut Author Challenge ARC Tour. Debuts can often be a crap shoot but I always have high hopes. There are some that blow you away, The Cadet Of Tildor, and others that just don’t resonate, Nobody But Us.  Mila 2.0 by Debra Driza landed somewhere in the middle.

Mila 2.0 is the story of a girl who learns she is an android and has a lot of difficulty accepting it. The first part of the book has Mila going to High School, where she is the new kid. Her only friend sets her sights on the new boy in school, who of course only has eyes for Mila. Not one to take this lying down, Kaylee creates a situation that leads to a terrible accident which should have killed Mila. This accident is not fatal but it does expose (literally) that she is not like most girls.

This is where the book should have gotten more interesting but it did not. Yes, Mila is upset to learn she is an android and that all of her memories are false. She is angry with the woman she thought was her mother for lying to her. I feel this portion of the book went on a little to long. It may be that I did not feel connected with Mila but I was just not that interested in her conflicted feelings of finding her true identity. I think the point was to humanize Mila, to show how she is a real girl with real feelings but the point is nearly drilled into the head of the reader.  

Once Mila moves past the teen angst stage, Mila 2.0 does start to pick-up. There are lots of great fighting sequences and tons of action. We learn more about the people involved in the Mila project and are even teased with information about a mole from a secret organization. This part of the book was my favorite and by far the most interesting.

Mila 2.0 leaves the reader wanting to know more, as is the fashion with most trilogies. Even though I found Mila 2.0 rather middle of the road, I do think there is plenty to explore in the world created by Debra Driza. I mostly enjoyed Mila 2.0 and would say it is a good debut novel that has the potential to become a more interesting story in books two and three.

What You Will Find

  • Cute Romantic Interest
  • Teen Angst
  • Bad Ass Fighting Robot
  • Conspiracies

Summary and cover image from goodreads.